EUROWEEKLY

AN examination board at the centre of the row over A-level students whose exams were not sent to the UK on time, will grant grades to some of the youngsters involved, it is understood.

Earlier this month it was revealed the European Sixth Form College in Mijas Costa had gone bust despite parents being asked for cash payments for fees just days before.

It was then that parents found a number of examinations had not been sent in time to the relevant boards, Cambridge and Edexcel, and that some course work had not been sent at all.

Cambridge then sent a group of its examiners to Spain from the UK and met parents. But in a statement released on September 21 it said scripts had been found “scattered across insecure locations in the school” and that “some scripts are still missing.”

The statement concluded that “with heavy hearts” it would not be issuing grades.

The Pearson Group, which runs Edexcel, also said it would not be issuing grades after identifying concerns which “called into question the integrity of the storage of assessment materials and the conduct of examinations at this centre.”

Now Pearson appears to have reassessed its decision but on a case-by-case basis.

One parent whose daughter faced the prospect of having moved to Leeds but being unable to start her Art course, has now been told she will be graded.

“She is one of the lucky ones,” the woman told EWN. “There was a real desire to help these young people. They realised these circumstances have never been faced before.”

But the situation for those students who sat Cambridge exams remains uncertain with most being told they must resit and arrange for suitable tuition in the meantime.

Meanwhile some parents have told EWN they are considering legal action alleging college principal Debbie Campbell accepted their cash payments knowing the college was on the verge of bankruptcy.

Euro Weekly | Costa del sol